Cheyenne/Arapaho Arrow Replica

Cheyenne/Arapaho Arrow Replica
Cheyenne/Arapaho Arrow Replica Cheyenne/Arapaho Arrow Replica Cheyenne/Arapaho Arrow Replica Cheyenne/Arapaho Arrow Replica Cheyenne/Arapaho Arrow Replica Cheyenne/Arapaho Arrow Replica Cheyenne/Arapaho Arrow Replica
Product Code: Cheyenne11
Availability: In Stock
Price: $80.00
Ex Tax: $80.00
Qty:     - OR -   Add to Wish List
Add to Compare

This gorgeous arrow is a museum-quality replica of an actual Cheyenne/Arapaho arrow housed in the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. The original artifacts were collected in the 1870's. I had the privilege to examine numerous authentic Plains arrows several years ago, and this arrow is a copy of on one of them. This arrow copies the original arrow in every respect, including dimensions, arrow shaft material, paint design, point shape, and nock shape. Give this arrow 100 years and you wouldn't be able to distinguish it from the original arrows I examined.

The shaft is made from a beautifully straight dogwood shoot. Dogwood was heavily utilized by the Plains tribes for arrows because it's dense, strong, heavy, and durable. The fletching consists of two turkey wing feathers and one turkey tail feather (Plains warriors often mixed different feathers on their arrows). The feathers are tied down front and back with deer sinew, then they were also glued to the shaft with hide glue, as was the original. The front portion of the feathers were not trimmed away where the sinew wrappings went, instead the sinew was wrapped over the long web of the feather, folding it down. This is exactly how they were done on the original arrow, so I followed suit. The metal point is made from a circular saw blade that's been blackened so it looks exactly like the blacksmith-made arrow points of the late 1800's, then the edges were sharpened to exposed the fresh, shiny metal underneath. The shaft has 3 straight shaft grooves that begin at the front of the feathers and extend to the point. The sinew wraps on the front of the feathers and those that secure the point are painted orange, and the shaft between those sinew wraps was painted yellow, so I did the same. And finally two bands of orange were painted under the feathers to complete this arrow. This gorgeous replica arrow is shipped to you in a sturdy PVC pipe to ensure safe delivery to your door.

Most Plains warriors carried at least 20 arrows just like this one in their quivers when they were out on campaign. And that's what made them such fearsome adversaries. Their incredible horsemanship, their short, powerful bows, iron tipped arrows, and their swift engagements and guerilla-style tactics made them a force to be reckoned with. Their individual fighting capabilities were so superior to the white settlers that there was almost no comparison. In fact, the Indians bows and arrows were superior weaponry to the first guns because they were only single shot. It wasn't until the introduction of repeating rifles and multi-shot revovlvers that the Indians were finally out-gunned.

Even still, many trespassers were victims to the Indian's wrath. As you scroll through the photos of this arrow, you'll come upon an old one from the late 1860's. It's a picture of US calvaryman Fredrick Wyllyams, who was killed in a battle with Sioux, Cheyenne, and Arapaho warriors. The warriors stripped him naked, slashed his throat, abdomen, and both thighs. Warriors would often mutilate a slain enemy because they believed that's how he would enter the afterlife and would be unable to harm them again. Without clothes he would be unable to fight in cold weather, and his hobbling injuries meant he couldn't run or chase after them. And finally, they left 5 arrows stuck in his body...arrows identical to the one offered here. How's that for owning a piece of history?

Arrow Specs: Dogwood shoot, metal point, sinew wrappings. 27 3/4 inches long. Shipped in sturdy PVC pipe.

Write a review

Your Name:


Your Review: Note: HTML is not translated!

Rating: Bad           Good

Enter the code in the box below:



Tags: replica
Copyright © 2013-2014 - all rights reserved.